Child custody is a delicate issue that often causes heated disputes between divorcing parents. Often, one parent will have to give up their children as long as the family lives in the same city or state. In cases where the parents live in different cities or states, it will be more difficult to decide who gets physical custody of the children and who receives legal custody. In some cases, courts can award joint physical custody so that both parents have equal visitation with their children.

The issue of child custody is a difficult one, not just for parents but for courts as well. Generally, courts will decide who the sole custodian of the child should be. If both parties are fit to have custody, they will have to determine which parent’s home will be better for the child. If only one party is deemed fit to have custody, then that party will maintain sole custody with visitation rights granted to the other parent. You essentially need the assistance and support of a Birmingham divorce attorney to fight in the court if you want child custody solely for you.

How Can Your Attorney Help You Gain Child Custody?

Are you struggling with the idea of your child being taken away from you? Do you want to keep them safe, happy, and near? A family attorney may be able to help you.

At the end of a divorce, parents are often faced with the difficult decision of who should get custody of their children. The court will determine what is best for the child based on many different factors, including who can provide a higher standard of living for their children or who has more time to spend with them. An attorney can help you decide which option is best for you and your family by guiding you through the legal process and helping to make sure that your rights are protected.

If you are a parent and want to gain sole or joint custody of your child, it is important to not only hire an attorney but to also be prepared for the process. There are several factors that could make it difficult for you to gain custody. These can include having a criminal record, past drug abuse, and using domestic violence tactics against your spouse.